Program

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM – UPDATED
International Cancer Screening Network Conference 2019
Screening in Balance

De Doelen ICC Rotterdam
Schouwburgplein 50
3012 CL Rotterdam
The Netherlands

Organized by Erasmus MC (Dept. of Public Health) and NCI (Center for Global Health)

Day 1 – Monday, June 3

9.00 am – 4:00 pm
Registration

9.00 am – 4:00 pm
Posters set-up (WEELDE ROOM)

10.00 am – 11.30 am
Concurrent sessions 1 (open working groups):

  • Open working group: Auditing the effectiveness of cervical screening in High Income Countries & toolkit for Low and Middle Income Countries (Chairs Alex Castanon / Mona Saraiya) (RUYS ROOM)
    Full description
  • Open working group: longitudinal adherence to FIT screening (Chairs Paul Doria-Rose / Douglas Puricelli Perin) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description
  • Open working group: Assessment of International Mammography Screening Skills (Chairs Mireille Broeders & Robert Smith) (VORM ROOM)
    Full description

11.30 am – 12.45 pm
Posters & Lunch at De Doelen

12.45 pm – 2.15 pm
Concurrent sessions 2 (workshops):

  • Open interactive workshop on overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening (Chairs Elsebeth Lynge / Jean-Luc Bulliard) (VORM ROOM)
    Full description
  • Open interactive workshop on individualized screening for colorectal cancer (Chairs Linda Rabeneck / Antonio Ponti) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description
  • Open interactive workshop on Health Technology Assessment (Chairs Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar / James O’Mahony) (RUYS ROOM)
    Full description

2.15 pm – 2.45 pm
Break

2.45 pm – 3.00 pm
Opening remarks (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)

3.00 pm – 5.15 pm
Plenary session 1:

  • Impact of screening policies (submitted abstracts) (Chairs Stephen Taplin / Harry de Koning) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

5.15 pm – 6.00 pm
Plenary debate 1:

  • ICSN Future (Panel discussion) (Chairs Stephen Taplin / Douglas Puricelli Perin / Amanda Vogel) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)

6.30 pm – 8.00 pm
Reception with drinks at Rotterdam Town Hall & Recognition of the scholarships

Day 2 – Tuesday, June 4

8.00 am – 4.00 pm
Registration

8.00 am – 12.00 pm
Posters set-up (WEELDE ROOM)

8.30 am – 9.30 am
Welcome and Keynote presentations “Imaging or blood”

(Chairs Harry de Koning / Stephen Taplin) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)

  • Welcome (Ernst Kuipers – Chairman of the Board of Directors, Erasmus MC)
  • Keynote: Artificial Intelligence (Wiro Niessen)
  • Keynote: Liquid Biopsies (Caroline Dive)

9.30 am – 10.00 am
Break

10.00 am – 11.30 pm
Plenary Session 2:

  • Novel strategies in screening (Chairs Harry de Koning / Stephen Taplin) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

11.30 am – 12.45 pm
Posters & Lunch at De Doelen

12.45 pm – 2.15 pm
Concurrent Sessions 3:

  • Cancer screening in Low- and Middle Income Countries (Chairs Stephen Taplin / David Weller) (VORM ROOM)
    Full description
  • Lung cancer screening (Chairs David Baldwin / Harry de Koning) (RUYS ROOM)
    Full description
  • Controversial issues in screening (Chairs Elsebeth Lynge / Robert Smith) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

2:15 am – 2.45 pm
Break

2.45 pm – 4.15 pm
Concurrent Sessions 4:

  • Impact of screening policies and strategies in cervical cancer screening (Chairs Mona Saraiya / Jean-Luc Bulliard) (RUYS ROOM)
    Full description
  • Impact of screening policies and strategies in colorectal cancer screening (Chairs Linda Rabeneck / Nereo Segnan) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description
  • Methodological questions (VORM ROOM)
    Full description

4.15 pm – 4.45 pm
Plenary Intermezzo

(WILLEM BURGER ROOM)

4.45 pm – 5.30 pm
Plenary Debate 2:

  • From evidence to guidelines to implementation (Chairs Robert Smith / Berit Andersen) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

6.30 pm – 10.30 pm

Network & Group Dinner at ss Rotterdam (pre-registration and payment required)
With special guest

Day 3 – Wednesday, June 5

8.00 am – 10.00 am
Registration

8.30 am – 9.45 am
Plenary Session 2:

  • Individualized screening (Chairs Mireille Broeders / Robert Smith) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

9.45 am – 10.30 am
Plenary Debate 3:

  • Communicating in personalized cancer screening (Chairs David Baldwin / Aruna Kamineni) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

10.30 am – 11.00 am
Break

11.00 am – 12.30 pm
Plenary Session 3:

  • Communicating screening in balance (Chairs Livia Giordano / Linda Rabeneck) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

12.30 pm – 1.45 pm
Posters & Lunch at De Doelen

1.45 pm – 3.00 pm
Plenary Session 4:

  • Reaching the hard-to-reach populations (Chairs David Weller / Mona Saraiya) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)
    Full description

3.00 pm – 3.30 pm
Break

3.30 pm – 5.00 pm
Plenary Session 5:

  • State of the art in screening (research) (Chairs Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar / Antonio Ponti) (WILLEM BURGER ROOM)

5.00 pm – 5.30 pm
Closure & Prize winners

(Harry de Koning / Stephen Taplin)

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Auditing the effectiveness of cervical screening in High Income Countries & toolkit for Low and Middle Income Countries

Improving data for decision-making: a toolkit for cervical cancer prevention and control programmes
Recently the World Health Organization and partners released a toolkit to help low- and middle income countries. The toolkit presents an aligned package of operational resources for improving the availability and use of high-quality data for decision-making in cervical cancer programmes. This package aims to assist ministries of health and other stakeholders in generating the information necessary to plan, implement, monitor, evaluate, and scale cervical cancer prevention and control programmes. The different aspects of the toolkit will be discussed and some examples of how countries have used this toolkit will be discussed. Is it time for international standards on auditing effectiveness of cervical screening programmes? This meeting of the working group for cervical cancer will provide an opportunity to discuss whether a call to action is warranted and how ICSN participants can be get involved. Real world cervical screening datasets will be used to evidence that case control study designs are the most efficient way of reliably assessing the effectiveness of screening. Details on how such studies should be designed and minimum dataset required will be presented.

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Open working group “longitudinal adherence to FIT screening”

Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is a highly effective way to prevent both incidence of and mortality from CRC. Multiple different modalities have been recommended for screening, including fecal immunochemical testing (FIT), sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy. The efficacy of short-interval tests like FIT is dependent on adherence to repeat testing, and positive FIT tests must be followed by diagnostic colonoscopy to identify and remove any polyps and to diagnose CRC. The Colorectal Cancer Screening Working Group is interested in assessing longitudinal adherence of FIT across countries, identifying appropriate measures, and eventually considering the effectiveness of these programs. We will present a review of commonly used measures to assess adherence to FIT and discuss a potential future collaboration to compare longitudinal adherence across multiple countries.

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Open working group “Assessment of International Mammography Screening Skills”

An ICSN working group developed a self-test that can be used across international sites to compare the interpretative ability of radiologists practicing in different screening environments. In this working group meeting we will report the results of a pilot of the self-test in 9 countries.

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Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening is a much disputed topic. But what is it? And how do we measure it? Interactive work-shop where we hope for many inputs to the discussion.

The most important unfavorable effect in breast cancer screening is overdiagnosis, but estimates differ tremendously. In this workshop 4 methodological presentations will form the basis for debate.

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Open interactive workshop on individualized screening for colorectal cancer

One size does not fit all anymore. This session focusses on approaches to individualized screening for colorectal cancer. Research on risk identification like genetics, lifestyle, demographics as well as its potential translation to personalized screening approaches is covered in this topic.

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Open interactive workshop on Health Technology Assessment

Almost any health care decision nowadays is dependent on HTA. In this interactive workshop key elements in cost-effectiveness will be presented and debated.

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Impact of screening policies

Evaluation of screening policies before and after implementation and the societal impact of screening strategies will be the focus of this session. Studies that use modelling techniques to evaluate potential screening strategy changes or population-based evaluation of established programs will be covered in this topic.

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Novel strategies in screening

This topic covers both new and renewed screening programs, such as primary HPV screening for cervical cancer or tomosynthesis in breast cancer screening.

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Cancer screening in Low- and Middle Income Countries

This session covers issues related to screening in low- and middle income countries, from setting up trials, to implementation of programs or evaluation of current situations or strategies.

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Lung cancer screening

This session covers the relatively new field of lung cancer screening, in many of its facets.

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Controversial issues in screening

This session covers a spectrum of issues that are often heavily debated in screening, such as overdiagnosis and the screening of elderly individuals.

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Impact of screening policies and strategies in cervical cancer screening

Evaluation of cervical cancer screening policies before and after implementation and the societal impact of cervical cancer screening strategies will be the focus of this session. Studies that use modelling techniques to evaluate potential screening strategy changes or population-based evaluation of established programs will be covered.

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Impact of screening policies and strategies in colorectal cancer screening

Evaluation of colorectal cancer screening policies before and after implementation and the societal impact of colorectal cancer screening strategies will be the focus of this session. Studies that use modelling techniques to evaluate potential screening strategy changes or population-based evaluation of established programs will be covered.

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Methodological questions

This session covers several methodological issues in screening evaluation and possible solutions.

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From evidence to guidelines to implementation

It is often a long and bumpy road from evidence to implementation. In this plenary debate, 2 speakers will present some new methodology on evidence synthesis (IARC handbooks) and on engaging citizens and professionals. The chairs will share their experiences in implentation in interaction with the audience.

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Individualized screening

One size does not fit all anymore. This session focusses on risk-based approaches across different cancer screening programs. Research on risk identification like genetics, lifestyle, demographics as well as its potential translation to personalized screening approaches is covered in this topic.

×

Communicating in personalized cancer screening

Personalized screening is likely to become the norm. However, it will pose a big challenge in terms of implementation and communication. In this plenary debate, present-day examples in breast and lung cancer screening will be discussed, together with a framework.

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Communicating screening in balance

Aspects related to communication will be covered in this session, with a focus on informed and shared decision making, patient-centered approaches, communicating screening results and engaging non-attenders.

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Reaching the hard-to-reach populations

Hard-to-reach populations are sub-groups whose geographic, economic or social conditions represent a challenge to service delivery or program implementation inside a target population. This session will include studies of barriers, models, and tests of interventions to offer screening to people who have never been screened or face challenges like cost, time constraints, cultural resistance or other factors making them less likely to be screened.